F.I.R.E., More experienced Investors, New To Finance, Uncategorised, Uncategorized

Savings Trick for Pattern-ish Peoples

Are you a lover of patterns and numbers?

Fibonacci fun

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b008ct2j

Golden Mean grins

http://www.csun.edu/~lmp99402/Math_Art/Golden%20Mean/golden_mean2.html

Times-tables totally terrific

Here is one simple action I do to trick myself into locking more money into savings:

Make the numbers in your savings accounts line up in a row.

Here’s what I mean, I use a notice saver account which means that I can’t access my savings for a minimum of 30 days no matter how many shiny things I want to buy.

This very neatly prevents me from buying shiny things.

About 2-3 days after arranging a transfer, I nearly always think twice about buying the shiny, shiny, stuff and cancel it. Ka-ching!

I try to add money to this account every single week, even if it’s only $1.

The way I trick myself into saving more, is by adding (say) $5 to each account, and then remembering how much I Love it when the numbers go in a row.

Isn’t it fun-ner to see a savings account at $8, 722.22 rather than $8, 714.37?

I think it’s waaaaaay better when the numbers all go in a row. It makes me happy.

And then, because you’re putting money in but not taking money out, the numbers go Up as well.

So not only do you have a cool number pattern, you’re also putting money into savings and increasing your wealth base.

Awesome!

All you do, is grab a calculator, and put enough money into the account so that the last four digits go in a row (eg $8, 714.37 would increase by $7.85 to make $8, 722.22).

Generally this will cost you no more than $11.12 per account, and when they’re all orderly and delicious, you’re going to feel really good.

Good luck and happy savings 🙂

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By reading this blog, you agree that you read it under your own risk, and Gill’s Practical Bookkeeping is in no way responsible for any harm or prejudice to yourself, your business, or any fictional examples above.

I am not a financial advisor. I do not have an AFSL. I am a chick who likes to read, think, write, and has access to google. You should treat this blog with the same seriousness that you would treat anyone whose main qualification is access to google. This blog is for entertainment purposes only. It’s a little like watching The Good Place for nerds or artists.

Anything you take from this blog is your responsibility. Nothing in this blog, even if you are mentioned by name, address, and telephone number, pertains to your personal situation. Anything you agree with, or disagree with, you are welcome to comment on, but your opinions belong to you. You are responsible for your comments. If they are offensive, I will remove them.

F.I.R.E., Life Hacks, More experienced Investors, New To Finance

What does it take to build a business?

Brene Brown says ‘if you’re not in the arena, participating, don’t you dare stand on the sidelines and put me down’. Tough words—basically if you haven’t got any skin in the game you haven’t got any authority to criticize.

I just watched two speakers pitch their businesses through Sydney City Council. Both speakers had the drive and creativity to reach at least $2 million in revenue. Despite being at the beginning of their potential, both businesses had already raised as much revenue as the median Australian earns in 40 years of work.

So what does it take to build a business?

The median sole trader earns around $10 000 per year of income (abs.gov.au). Yet in Australia’s $2.5 trillion economy there are many small to medium businesses that earn much more than that.

So how do you get from averaging $10 000 to $2 million+?

I don’t know how. I’ve not been able to do that, yet.

But I do know some things that don’t work:

  • Law-of-Attraction or prayer—being a good person and living mindfully is one thing, but if you pray to win the lottery instead of putting the work into a business plan, you’re not going to get much out of it besides a gambling addiction.
  • Pessimism and deciding you’ve failed before you’ve begun. Again, great to take criticism and feedback on board, but despair and defeated-ness are definitely not winners.
  • Refusing to listen to feedback—ask your customers what they think of your product
  • Basing your product entirely on what other people ask for—Henry Ford said “if I had asked people what they wanted they would’ve told me to breed faster horses”.
  • Charging by the hour for your own work. It’s not scalable. Even if you earn $100 per hour, you will never make the return on investment that you would if you had a scalable product.

Let me know your thoughts in the comments below 🙂

References:

www.abs.gov.au

www.austrade.gov.au

https://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/talks-courses-workshops/visiting-entrepreneur-program

https://www.haymarkethq.com/

https://brenebrown.com/

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By reading this blog, you agree that you read it under your own risk, and Gill’s Practical Bookkeeping is in no way responsible for any harm or prejudice to yourself, your business, or any fictional examples above.

I am not a financial advisor. I do not have an AFSL. I am a chick who likes to read, think, write, and has access to google. You should treat this blog with the same seriousness that you would treat anyone whose main qualification is access to google. This blog is for entertainment purposes only. It’s a little like watching The Good Place for nerds or artists.

Anything you take from this blog is your responsibility. Nothing in this blog, even if you are mentioned by name, address, and telephone number, pertains to your personal situation. Anything you agree with, or disagree with, you are welcome to comment on, but your opinions belong to you. You are responsible for your comments. If they are offensive, I will remove them.

Beauty
F.I.R.E., Life Hacks, Review, Uncategorised

Review: Derek Dammers Youtube Channel from a Marketing Perspective

On Derek Dammers’ youtube channel, he’s fishing both for living humans and living fish. He’s a salary man, who fishes in his spare time, and is slowly turning his favourite hobby into a business. He has fished for forty years around the harbour, rivers, and lakes of Sydney. He’s an extremely technical person, and a bit of perfectionist. He’s also patient and quite gentle, which makes him a good teacher.

Here are some of the great things he’s done:

  • Visual acuity and slow motion. This channel is perfect for visual learners. Anyone who wants to watch again and again and again to perfect their casting technique can.
  • Beautiful settings and surrounds. Each of these videos is shot in areas of great beauty both formed by humans and natural.
  • Short Videos. The longest video is 40 seconds long. This succinctness means that there is no superfluous information and you never waste your time watching.
  • Thoughtfulness of shooting and subject. If you’re looking to improve your physical know-how, this is a great way to do it. He’s really thought about how to teach, and what to teach, and he’s done a good job.

Here are some of the things he could improve:

  • Not everyone is a visual learner. Some people need to hear a story, or might need words to understand what you’re doing.
  • Credentials. Derek is a teacher, trying to set up a business as a teacher, but he’s establishing his credentials as an expert, rather than a teacher.
  • Accesibility. If you’re trying to teach beginners, or less experienced fishermen, they’re not necessarily going to understand what you’re doing right, and what they’re doing wrong

Suggestions:

  • Add a couple of 2-minute videos explaining what’s happening in the short videos
  • Put up student testimonials, and videos of lesson before and afters
  • Do a beginners series for those going fishing for the first time
  • Embed a button in each video with a Call To Action leading to what you’re selling

Overall, a great channel for anyone who wants to learn fly fishing or anyone who wants to see some great photos and videos of Sydney Harbour.

Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEc6ld_-5SihhuXYn0o57wQ

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By reading this blog, you agree that you read it under your own risk, and Gill’s Practical Bookkeeping is in no way responsible for any harm or prejudice to yourself, your business, or any fictional examples above.

I am not a financial advisor. I do not have an AFSL. I am a chick who likes to read, think, write, and has access to google. You should treat this blog with the same seriousness that you would treat anyone whose main qualification is access to google. This blog is for entertainment purposes only. It’s a little like watching The Good Place for nerds or artists.

Anything you take from this blog is your responsibility. Nothing in this blog, even if you are mentioned by name, address, and telephone number, pertains to your personal situation. Anything you agree with, or disagree with, you are welcome to comment on, but your opinions belong to you. You are responsible for your comments. If they are offensive, I will remove them.

F.I.R.E., Life Hacks, politics, Uncategorised

Free speech in Australia.

I was having a conversation with the adonis who I train with recently. He was talking about how we have freedom of the press and freedom of speech in Australia, and how that was great.

I was interested in this because I disagree that we currently have those freedoms.

Change is possible

Yes, I’m aware of the irony of sitting in a comfortable Sydney home, on the internet, writing that we don’t have freedom of speech or freedom of the press in Australia.

This week Australia’s High Court made a decision that means that any company in Australia that has an internet presence, is liable for the comments on their social media accounts or website.  

One of the consequences of this is that ordinary people who do try to speak out about things going wrong may well be moderated out of the discourse.

Australia updated secrecy laws in 2018, making it illegal to talk about certain things, either in Australia or overseas (if you’re interested, read part 5.6 of the federal Criminal Code (1995)).

This year Australia appointed a High Court judge Justice Simon Steward who stated that freedom of speech and freedom of political communication are not “settled law”.

This is part of a long term trend in Australia to pass laws that punish or criminalize people for having opinions, exposing government wrongdoing, and speaking out in the public interest.

So? What can you do?

Here’s the problems, what are the solutions?

  • Write to your local member, asking for more political freedoms and asking them to uphold your right to political communication and freedom of speech
  • Write a blog post about your thoughts
  • Write something on social media about freedom of speech in Australia, tag your local member, the Attorney General’s Department and the federal parliament
  • Write to the editor of your favourite newspaper
  • Read and share blog posts like this one
  • Participate in public discourse– bring it up at dinner, bring it up at a public forum, talk about what’s going on
  • Start or sign a petition asking for change asking for the right to protest.
  • Start a T-shirt Campaign
  • Make Art about it
  • Write a story about it
  • Express yourself through poetry
  • Make some rocking music
  • Put your thoughts into photos
  • Meditate on healing the world
  • Send good wishes into the lives of other people
  • Connect with people in your community so that we can lift the cohort
  • Get a qualification or do a short course to keep yourself fresh and keep your brain working
  • Meditate on having love in your heart
  • Learn a language
  • Become F.I.R.E so you’re not a slave to a job any more.

It might not think that these will change things politically, but every time you lift yourself out of fatalistic, nihilistic depression, you remind yourself of the truth:

You have power. You have creativity. You can do something. Change is possible.

Remember: Always be kind.

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This blog is fiction. By reading this blog, you agree that you read it under your own risk, and Gill’s Practical Bookkeeping is in no way responsible for any harm or prejudice to yourself, your business, or any fictional examples above.

I am not a financial advisor. I do not have an AFSL. I am a chick who likes to read, think, write, and has access to google. You should treat this blog with the same seriousness that you would treat anyone whose main qualification is access to google. This blog is for entertainment purposes only. It’s a little like watching The Good Place for nerds or artists.

Anything you take from this blog is your responsibility. Nothing in this blog, even if you are mentioned by name, address, and telephone number, pertains to your personal situation. Anything you agree with, or disagree with, you are welcome to comment on, but your opinions belong to you. You are responsible for your comments. If they are offensive, I will remove them.

Life Hacks, politics, Uncategorised

Constructive Ways to Protest

COVID 19 is a real disease. In Florida, which has a comparable population to Australia and no lockdowns, there have been 44 000 deaths attributed to COVID 19.

In Australia, Google reports 1002 deaths.

That means that it could be argued that Australia’s lockdowns have saved 43 000 lives. The ripples of those lives will spread out in our society and instead of causing so many people heart-rending grief, our loved ones will be safe.

All of those people have families. All of those people are part of our community.

We are so lucky

At the same time, the lockdowns worry me.

Deploying troops in civilian communities worries me. Using military leadership to organise a COVID 19 response worries me. These are people who are literally trained to kill, who deliberately joined an organisation knowing that they might be involved in killing people.

Is that really who we want trying to stop frightened teenagers from visiting each other in Western Sydney?

My understanding is that military personnel cannot be held criminally liable if they fail to follow the laws of the state or territory they are deployed in. I’m also aware of the recent war crimes accusations in Afghanistan, where Australian troops seem to have deliberately shot civilians.

Another thing that worries me is governments putting restrictions on freedom of movement, freedom of association, and the freedom we expect as citizens of a democratic country to go about our lives peacefully, privately, and without undue examination of our personal lives. Civil liberties are important.

This is why I think it’s OK to protest the lockdowns. My problem is not with the protest, but with the protester’s methodology.

Many people in Australia feel that our democratic freedoms are being eroded, and I think that it’s important to express political actions and opinions in a safe and calm manner.

Taken at Joe Dispenza 2016

Examples of appropriate protests in this climate:

  • Sign this petition, here
  • Get all your protesting people together, and instead of blockading Central Station, blockade the Harbour Bridge for an hour or two, safe in your car, social distancing, not catching COVID. Note that there is a process in Australia for authorising protests, and I highly recommend you follow this process.
  • Get all your protesting people to make a placard, stand in their local shopping centre wearing a mask for an hour, call the local paper, and take pictures and put them on social media
  • Start a T-Shirt campaign on RedBubble or Café Press
  • Write to a media organisation– your local paper, the TV station you mainly watch, the websites you usually visit and others expressing your opinion.
  • Write to your local member (they Do take public opinion into account)
  • Put a post up on social media about it
  • Make Art about it
  • Read blogs about it and share them.

You have power. Your opinion matters. Try to find a constructive way to express it.

Taken at Joe Dispenza retreat

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By reading this blog, you agree that you read it under your own risk, and Gill’s Practical Bookkeeping is in no way responsible for any harm or prejudice to yourself, your business, or any fictional examples above.

I am not a financial advisor. I do not have an AFSL. I am a chick who likes to read, think, write, and has access to google. You should treat this blog with the same seriousness that you would treat anyone whose main qualification is access to google. This blog is for entertainment purposes only. It’s a little like watching The Good Place for nerds or artists.

Anything you take from this blog is your responsibility. Nothing in this blog, even if you are mentioned by name, address, and telephone number, pertains to your personal situation. Anything you agree with, or disagree with, you are welcome to comment on, but your opinions belong to you. You are responsible for your comments. If they are offensive, I will remove them.